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Monocle

September 2012

Carving out a niche

“We just wanted a studio, not a business,” says Jason Horvath of the Brooklyn-based firm  Uhuru. Fresh out of design school in 2002, Horvath and fellow graduate Bill Hilgendorf moved to Providence, Rhode Island, to do bit work in cabinet-making and interior design.

“We just needed a place to tinker on personal projects at nights and on weekends,” Horvath says. Today the studio has a reputation for handmade, limited-edition pieces made from slats from the salvaged Coney Island Boardwalk, teak from the deck of a decommissioned battleship and white-oak bourbon barrels. “Instead of doing more trade shows, taking out ads or buying Google key words, we’ve always built what we liked and placed the pieces within like-minded businesses” Horvath says.- AP uhurudesign.com

Why it works:  There’s a culture of transparency. Every month the owners hold an open forum with the staff to discuss finances, new business, and press coverage.

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INTERIOR DESIGN MARKET TABLOID